Terrible ads – A new trend in making

The higher-quality the ad, the better its impact? Maybe not, in today’s saturated market.

In April, the Plenty of Fish Ad Blog put out a post that quickly made waves among the technorati and advertising-focused, as its conclusions were antithetical to the common sense surrounding how to garner the attention of the public. You see, Plenty of Fish put together a slick, normal Facebook ad, and they made a utterly terrible one in Paint. Here’s the two ads:

2012 05 24 13h36 24 Guerrilla trend: Make an ad so terrible that it will stand out, and drive clicks

2012 05 24 13h36 40 Guerrilla trend: Make an ad so terrible that it will stand out, and drive clicks

Now, the numbers. The top ad had a 0.049% click through rate as tested over 15,000 impressions, not a shocking figure. However, the bottom ad had a click through rate of 0.137% over the same number of impressions. That’s a 2.8:1 ratio, which is massive.

Of course, one study is hardly gospel, but the results were intersting enough that it piqued the curiosity of many. It wasn’t hard to guess that someone was going to try the same gimic, right? Today, this SpotHero ad popped up on Facebook :

2012 05 24 13h40 40 Guerrilla trend: Make an ad so terrible that it will stand out, and drive clicks

I like it. Frankly, you know that the above ad would snag your eyes much more rapidly than something more produced. The best part has to be the artifacts around the logo, which are proof that this ad was designed to be as bad, and thus as good, as possible.

Terrible, it’s the new good.

Advertisements

~ by digivine on May 25, 2012.

One Response to “Terrible ads – A new trend in making”

  1. Good to see other people testing! That was the take away message of my blog post. The icing on the cake has to be the speed lines behind their car LOL.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: